Porth Nanven, November 18th, 2018

Two sketches of the Cape from across Porth Nanven on a blustery, chilly autumn day.  There’s not a lot variation between the high and low water mark during this part of the tidal cycle, so incoming waves tend spend themselves further out to sea.  On occasion a series of big waves pile up over the off-shore reefs in a mountainous cascade, the easterly wind shredding the wave crests and driving curtains of spume out to sea — only the remnant ‘ghosts’ of these waves remain to tumble into shore.

 

Plein air, oil on board apprx. 24 x 15cm

 

Plein air, oil on board apprx. 24 x 15cm

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Porth Nanven Morning, November 11th 2018, 10.15am

Plein air, oil on board apprx. 24 x 15cm

A blustery November morning down at Porth Nanven. A steady southwesterly force 5 to 6 meant I had to stabilize my gear with some rocks ( which didn’t help with the wind buffeting the panel I was painting on! ) but that was preferable and easier to deal with than conditions where a sudden heavy gust can easily drive your gear and painting face down in the dirt or straight into the ocean before you have time to react. In windy conditions even a small panel can act as a very efficient sail. When I attempt some larger paintings on site, guy ropes and a couple of tent pegs will come in handy whenever the wind is up.