Moonrise over Kenidjack

Plein air, oil on board apprx. 24 x 15cm

It’s been several years since I was last able to get to this viewpoint in lower Kenidjack valley. The National Trust periodically clears all the underbrush here and one can get closer to the reed beds growing in the old leat system which diverted and harnessed the stream to drive the water wheels located a few hundred yards further downstream. For a month or so at the start of the year, the thin branches of the windblown, stunted trees turn a beautiful wine-dark shade of red just before the first buds begin to appear.

Rain, Porth Nanven, January 19th 2019, 2.30pm

Plein air, oil on board apprx. 24 x 15cm

After more than a month of dull, uninteresting weather conditions and very little sunshine, a day of frequent, heavy rain showers and some decent waves provided the impetus to go down to Porth Nanven and try some painting in the rain.

Painting in oils in falling rain or snow is always a challenge as not surprisingly, oil paint and water don’t mix. The water contaminates the paint forming a gloopy, very difficult to control emulsion, while droplets of water on the painting surface prevent later layers of paint from adhering to the layers underneath. Still, despite the difficulties it was good to get outside again to paint the ocean.

Porth Nanven, November 18th, 2018

Two sketches of the Cape from across Porth Nanven on a blustery, chilly autumn day.  There’s not a lot variation between the high and low water mark during this part of the tidal cycle, so incoming waves tend spend themselves further out to sea.  On occasion a series of big waves pile up over the off-shore reefs in a mountainous cascade, the easterly wind shredding the wave crests and driving curtains of spume out to sea — only the remnant ‘ghosts’ of these waves remain to tumble into shore.

 

Plein air, oil on board apprx. 24 x 15cm

 

Plein air, oil on board apprx. 24 x 15cm